Foreign Currency and Currency Exchange Rates Internal ...

Claiming Forex losses with IRS on tax return?

I had a net loss of about $600 for 2014 at FXCM US and had difficulty finding a clear explanation on how to properly file this on a tax return. The one reference suggested filing EACH trade, but I made thousands of trades last year. Any help appreciated. Using H&R Block.
submitted by user3404 to Forex [link] [comments]

US Taxes

For any US traders out there that are profitable and paying taxes, what overall % can I expect to keep/lose from taxes.
For example I can expect to keep 50% of my profits and pay the other 50% to taxes.
Does anyone have any roundabout numbers or %?
I’ve read what US forex traders usually have to do for filing taxes but it’s hard to really get an idea of that without having actual money to use, and I still kinda don’t understand it. So I’m just looking for a rounded number or something.
Thanks
submitted by gR0o0oT to Forex [link] [comments]

Forex & taxes!

I am a day trader I trade the forex market I’ve been trading for 3 years. This year was my biggest by far. I’ve made more money this year than I ever have in the 3 years I’ve been learning to trade. My question if anyone knows the answer is do I have to create an LLC or Scorp for my trading for taxes?? I’ve never done it before because I wasn’t making much money and didn’t think I mattered but since I’m making more money now I wasn’t sure. I don’t want to get in trouble with the IRS & know not what to do. I still work at Starbucks as a shift supervisor and day trade most morning before work. Now I’m constantly starting to match my weekly paycheck & putting everything to the side to eventually buy my first house to rent out.
submitted by Priscillapaychecks to Fire [link] [comments]

Throw your money in the trash

When the globe stops using money, Alchemy will begin.
If I hired you for a job and gave you money, what would you spend the money on? Open your stock app...Look at all those numbers...do you even know what ur looking at?
Neither do most investment bankers.
Money could be used responsibly but to keep money relevant, you would need to create global chaos and hardship. Otherwise people would realize that it’s insanely easy to walk away from.
A drug user steals jewelry to sell to the pawn shop to get money. Then pays the drug dealer with the money. The drug user could’ve exchanged the stolen jewelry directly for the drugs.
The stock market, the irs, forex are all complicated by design. It was never meant for anyone to understand well. Even the irs couldn’t do their own taxes.
When you’re gaining insights that Wall Street analysts never did, the system is too complicated.
When the globe stops using money, Alchemy research begins.
submitted by Alchemy_hates_money to u/Alchemy_hates_money [link] [comments]

¿Replicar mi portfolio en otra divisa es una buena idea?

Estoy re-armando mi "lazy-portfolio" que básicamente va a consistir en IWDA + EIMI (entre ambos al 90%) y eventualmente en unos años AGGU (bonos, hasta el 10% e ir subiendo a medida que pasen los años). Mi objetivo es quedarme comprado de acá a 10 o 15 años COMO MINIMO y comprar todos los meses mi cuota de tickers.
Como tenía armada una posición en VTI (all US market), al desarmarla me quedaron USD que usé para empezar a armar IWDA (USD) y acá me surgió una duda para la cual no encontré grandes fuentes de referencia.
IWDA también cotiza en EUR, bajo otro ticker, y yo podría armar mi posición (o replicarla) en esta divisa, o simplemente quedarme en USD. Es el mismo caso para los otros dos tickers, todos cotizan en EUR y yo podría comprarlos en esta moneda.
Mi método de fondeo al broker es en EUR ya que las transferencias SEPA me son mucho más baratas que las SWIFT, con lo cual si yo persiguiera un portfolio en USD, debería sumar un costo de FOREX para salir de mi banco (ya que mi dinero está en USD) y luego nuevamente pasar a USD en el broker para comprar el ticket de IWDA. Si bien las comisiones por estas transformaciones son "bajas", mi plan es a largo plazo y quiero intentar optimizarlo donde se pueda.
Entonces, me surgieron estas dudas:
1 - ¿es mejor que evite el doble forex e ir directo al ticker en EUR? Este cotiza en el exchange de Amsterdan, pero yo entiendo que el ETF sigue igual domiciliado en Irlanda, con lo cual a nivel taxes sigue conviniendo, indistintamente de la moneda en la que compre el ticker.
2 - ¿Sería buena estrategia diversificar la divisa de este portfolio? Podría replicar mi posición de manera de que quede 50% en USD y 50% en EUR. A priori me suena que es mala idea por fees, pero quiero entender todo el panorama. Para poner un ejemplo, vi en otros subs gente "enojada" porque la ganancia por la suba del ticker de IWDA se la comió la caída del USD con respecto al EUR (siendo ellos residentes europeos).
3- Estoy en el fixed price tier de Interactive Brokers. Cada compra cuesta 5USD (precio fijo, no importa la cantidad) y de forex tendré entre 2/3 USD más. Y si no compro nada en un mes me cobran 10USD. Esto me hizo pensar que a la hora de rebalancear, quizas sería mejor idea tener un portfolio con solo dos ETF, como VWRA + AGGU. ¿Qué opinión les parece esto? Igual la pregunta 1 es válida para este caso también.
Les dejo links a los diferentes ETFS:
IWDA (todo el mercado en paises desarrollados):
https://www.ishares.com/uk/individual/en/products/251882/
EIMI (todo el mercado en paises emergentes, es casi todo china):
https://www.ishares.com/uk/individual/en/products/264659/ishares-msci-emerging-markets-imi-ucits-etf
AGGU (bonos)
https://www.ishares.com/uk/individual/en/products/291772/ishares-core-global-aggregate-bond-ucits-etf-fund
VWRA (de Vanguard, todo el mercado, pero sigue otro indice)
https://global.vanguard.com/portal/site/loadPDF?country=nl&docId=21869
submitted by dddmmmx to merval [link] [comments]

[Econ] Can You Not Die For One Second?

[M] This meme I made describes how I feel right now, why can’t my economy just be normal and just function, very upsetting. [/M]
The Russian economy is in freefall, which is quite an unfortunate problem to say the least. After experiencing minor growth for the past two years, the economy has decided to kill itself, which can be quite an issue when unemployment skyrockets to 22%, and the value of the rouble drops faster than Saudi Arabia’s chance of not being stuck in an eternal civil war. Taking experience from the 2008-2009 and the 2014-2017 Russian financial crises, we are well prepared to restore economic order to the country. This must be done quickly, as the longer we stall around, the more our people shall suffer, and the odds of escaping this pit of economic despair shrink. To escape this financial crisis, there are three main fields that need to be addressed extensively to prevent the economy from detonating on itself. The first field being social welfare and the lives of the people within Russia. With unemployment at 22%, the people of Russia will be suffering, and if we are to emerge from this crisis, we need to work with them and ensure their safety and wellbeing to recover faster. The second field is the rouble, and the general state of the economy. The value of the rouble has skyrocketed, and inflation is running rampant, which if this is allowed to continue, will decimate our economy even more, so this must be brought under control as soon as possible. Furthermore, many businesses and factories in the country have slashed employees and have almost gone out of business themself, so drastic action needs to be taken there. Finally, the final field being the roots of the crisis, corruption, and the sanctions on Russia from the west. The roots of the problem need to be pruned so that a disaster like this never happens again.
Russia is stuck between a rock and a hard place right now, but this is our trying moment. If we emerge from this disaster, we will come out stronger than ever before, and will become closer as a country, showing that Russia is the only way forward. Through cooperation between the people and the government, we will make it through this crisis.
Field One: Welfare
One of the key fields of this crisis that needs to be addressed is the welfare of the people. Unemployment is at a record 22%, and this must be addressed before anything else can be done. With this many people unemployed and not able to get jobs, this will cause havoc all across Russia as people will struggle to make ends meet in terms of living their lives. To counteract the immediate issues that this will cause, food, shelter, and other amenities for people need to be secured and guaranteed. First off, guaranteeing food for all people who are unable to afford it or acquire it while being unemployed. In recent years our production of all agricultural goods has skyrocketed due to the introduction of GMOs, so we can provide government “soup kitchens” for the unemployed to come and reliably get food. The government will provide the farmers with money for their crops, and in return the food can be placed into these free places for people to eat, therefore avoiding the concern of people starving. Housing will not be as critical of an issue, as there is state housing available, but it is limited in capacity, so something must still be done. This issue can be solved with the issue of unemployment, which I will elaborate on further. Essentially, new state housing will be built in all places that need housing for the unemployed, and this can provide temporary residences for the people to stay out of the elements when the time comes. As for things like health care and such, these are provided by the government, and due to the recession, funding for them will be raised to account for the inevitable rise in human needs.
To place a major dent in the issue of unemployment, much with what the United States did during the 1930s during the Great Depression, we will be taking a leaf out of their book and creating a plethora of new programs. The major program however, will be the program known as Rehabilitation Russia, which will revolve around infrastructure improvements all across Russia, and constructing new buildings as well. This ties into building new state housing, and draws inspiration from the programs from the American New Deal in the 1930s, namely the Works Progress Administration, Civilian Conservation Corps, and the Public Works Administration. All of these programs focused on providing work to unemployed people, and working on infrastructure around the country. This same principle can be applied in Russia, hopefully to the same degree of success. The temporary jobs granted through these programs can provide enough time for the factories that these people were laid off from to be up and running again. With all of this in place, this can grant additional benefit to Russia while also ensuring that these people do not go without jobs. While not everyone will get a job from these programs, it will stem the major flow of unemployment for the meantime, and hopefully grant enough time for the major sources of employment to reopen.
Additionally, for those who are unemployed, the current unemployment benefits are nowhere close to being enough to allow a person to survive. Per month currently, each person only gets around 12-80$ of unemployment money, which is insultingly low. In this recession, with a large number of people in unemployment, this number needs to be increased drastically. To aid the people who are unemployed, the minimum amount of money that can be granted per month will be raised to $150 USD, and the maximum will be raised to $960 USD, which depends on the lifestyle of each person. Someone who has a large family will receive the larger benefit, and someone who is alone will be granted the smaller funds. By raising the unemployment benefits for the recession, this will allow for the people of Russia to still be able to actually survive during these uncertain times.
The funding needed for this will come from slashing other budgets across the scale, and from loans from the Central Bank of Russia. These loans, of course, will be eventually repaid once the recession is over, but something must be done in the meantime to provide the people with a form of welfare and the means to survive.
Field Two: The Economy:
The rouble is in freefall, and the economy is about to be hit by a large train of shinkage, which is quite an issue to summarize. The first thing that must be done for the economy will be to stabilize the rouble. To stabilize the rouble, just like in 2014, the Central Bank of Russia will withdraw $5 billion USD to purchase roubles in the Russian economy to work on stabilizing the currency. Due to the large reserves of the Russian Federation, this can easily be accomplished, and should be more than enough towards stabilizing the rouble. This being done will go a long way towards climbing out the recession, as the stabilization of the rouble will bring back confidence in the economy. To help revive the economy, a government bailout program will be the way that the economy is saved. Russia has extensive reserves of foreign currencies (henceforth referred to as forex reserves) that we have been saving for an event like this for sometime, and now is the time to use them. While $5 billion USD from our forex reserves is being spent to prop up the rouble, this will not be enough to stabilize the economy totally. Therefore a bailout program on a massive scale is required, and the estimated total cost of the government program is $200 billion USD. Around $100-150 billion of this can be gained domestically through raising the VAT and other taxes, while also dipping into our forex reserves and slashing the budget of other ministries. The rest of this money, however, will be given as a bailout loan from the IMF, depending on how much they are willing to give us. This government bailout will be critical to prevent the entire country from entering further economic collapse, and will give us a swift rebound. Where the money goes for the bailouts, however, will be very important as the money is limited as to where it will go. Therefore the money will mainly be focused on reopening factories and bringing back old job positions before the recession. Furthermore, money will also be needed to bailout other important companies that went under in the recession, so focusing on other businesses other than manufacturing is also important, as more places other than that went under. Small businesses in particular are quite important as large numbers of them went under during the crisis, so further bailouts for them are needed. The money will be divided as follows, $100 billion towards manufacturing bailouts as this sector of the economy was the hardest hit from the recession, $50 billion for small businesses, as they were also hit particularly hard, and $50 billion for other sectors of the economy that were hit, but not as hard as the previously mentioned ones. Through these targeted bailouts and financial measures, this should stem the flow from the recession. These measures emanate those from both the 2008-2009 and the 2014-2017 financial crises, and things that worked then will work now.
Acquiring the funding for the bailouts domestically, however, will be difficult, and drastic measures must be taken to ensure this. The value added tax in Russia in particular will be raised from 20% up to 27% for the foreseeable future until the financial crisis has passed, and then past then it will be restored to the normal levels. In particular, the taxes on natural resource extracting will be raised up 2% from whichever level it was previously (this is done because the rates fluctuate for each resource and I don’t want to spend 3 hours writing down each and every one). Through both of these specific taxes being raised, the money from this will be enough to enable the bailout measure to be mostly be funded domestically, rather than through IMF loans. The raising of these taxes is only a temporary measure, and once the recession is over, they will go back to their standard levels so as not to make our citizens' lives even more difficult.
Field Three: The Roots of the Crisis
Despite having extensive measures to stop a crisis like this from even happening, they were not enough to escape the roots of the problems that led to this happening. Corruption and sanctions from the EU were the drivers of this entire recession, and something must be done to combat each and every one of them. No more measures to just delay the inevitable, these issues all right here stop this year, or the next year, Russia will no longer play victim towards the whims of the roots. Action will be taken, and these issues will cease to exist.
Corruption is something that Vladimir Putin has already touched upon at an earlier time, but this time more must be done. Anti-corruption courts were already empowered, and corruption in various different sectors of the government was dealt with to remove the epidemic of bribery that existed within the country. However, one part of corruption that has not been dealt with was tax fraud and tax evasion, which now more than ever is something that needs to be clamped down on. Following the model of the United State’s Internal Revenue Service (IRS), we can mimic their actions to catch those who attempt to deprive the government of their taxes. Russia has a right rate of tax evasion and tax fraud, and by checking over reports sent by their employers and other third parties, and comparing it to their taxes, we can catch people who commit tax fraud. This is an issue that Vladmir Putin feels strongly about, so he will be personally expecting results from this now, and in the future. By attacking those who commit tax fraud and tax evasion, we can also provide the government with more revenue that is sorely needed at this time.
Sanctions from the EU, however, have already been lifted significantly, and this will serve as the rallying cause for our economy. With the aid of European trade coming in, this can serve to assist our economy in climbing out of the recession. While this is not agreeable for our policy, this is something that must be done to ensure the economy does not suffer anymore than it has to. In the future, once the recession is over however, Russia will return to its former strength and prosper once again.
Government interventions into the recession that are swift and precise can help bring about an end to this recession sooner and better. Following methods that worked during the last recessions and financial crises, Russia can escape this calamity stronger than before.
submitted by ForeignGuess to Geosim [link] [comments]

Questions of Inexperience

i started trading in october of last year. when i joined a lot of people i knew recommended Hugo’s Way, which is an unregulated broker. although i haven’t and the guys who told me have never had a bad experience with them, it just really concerns me in the back of my mind that it’s a risk. (i really do like their site though, it’s simple to use and easy to withdraw) so with that being said, i have a couple of questions ..
1.) is it illegal to USE unregulated and or offshore brokers as a US citizen?
2.) will it effect me paying my taxes on forex?
3.) i obviously haven’t made a lot of income yet as a new trader, so should i be worried about filing my taxes from 2019?
4.) how much income as a trader should i bring in before i start having to report it to the IRS?
if anyone can answer these questions for me, it will be greatly appreciated lol. googling them hasn’t been giving me the most direct answers i’ve been looking for, but i did see a few other reddit posts that helped generate an answer.
submitted by MajTheAlmighty to Forex [link] [comments]

How do taxes work for Forex income?

I'm a newbie still learning the in's and out's of Forex. Just curious on how Forex traders are taxed. I'm assuming you get a tax form from your broker that says your net profit then the IRS taxes you a some percent. Can someone fill in the details on how it all works. Thanks Forex community!
Edit: I live in the US
submitted by jd_ultra to Forex [link] [comments]

I am Canadian day trader day trading in US dollars. Will I owe IRS taxes at the end of the year?

I am a Canadian about to start day trading in short term in ForEx and commodities like gold. I will have transactions of over 300 in 1 week for part time (20 hours a week). My trading account is in US dollars but I live in Canada.
Will I owe IRS taxes at the end of the year even though I day trade in Canada using US dollars?
Please note that I will have more questions when I see responses so I have the facts to prepare for the end of the year.
if you could please help me with this, there is not much content on the web for being a Canadian day trader using US dollars for transactions. Any canadian books or legitimate web links to read up on would be great as well.
Edit: what is the minimum amount of transactions per hour per week to be categorized as business income/ loss rather than capital gains/loss?
submitted by jampong321 to cantax [link] [comments]

It's a lot harder to make money in forex if you pay your taxes

In 2016 I made ~3000 USD trading with Oanda and correctly guessing the outcome of the brexit referendum.
I did my taxes through HR block that year, and it took a bit to figure out how to report my earnings through forex trading. The accountant told me in fact she'd never heard of anyone doing this before.
Forex brokers are not required to report client earnings to the IRS, unlike companies that fall under the legal definition of a broker
OANDA does not report taxes on behalf of our clients, and as a result we do not provide any tax forms relating to profit/loss on your account (e.g. 1099-B form). The information you would need to complete your tax reporting can be found on your annual account statement, which you can download from your My Account page by clicking on 'View account statements'. Information about other types of tax form OANDA does provide can be found below.
However, this should be obvious, (EDIT: if you're subject to US taxes) you have a legal obligation to pay income taxes on any money you earn through forex, unless you have a lawyer or accountant who says otherwise (for instance because you're trading on behalf of a company etc).
Of course with forex trading, there is money lost on the spread, but the money lost in taxes in years where you win is much greater. Forex earnings are income taxes so while it is true that you can deduct losses in years where you lose significant money there's a major issue, the standard deduction.
With the standard deduction recently increased, most middle class tax payers will want to select it. But selecting the standard deduction means you can't deduct forex trading losses from that year.
This is something people don't pay enough thought to when they plan on doing forex trading. So I just wanted to let people know that there's a force far greater than the spread that you need to contend with.
tl;dr growing up, is awfuller, than all the awful things that ever were
submitted by scwizard to Forex [link] [comments]

Taxes

Hey Guys. So I like in America and I know every money you make the IRS has to get theirs. How do I avoid paying taxes since forex isn’t my day job as I only do it on the side. Ps I withdraw in BTC
submitted by donshanko to Forex [link] [comments]

Rolled Over 401k to IRA with Trust Company, Started LLC, got IRA funds distributed to LLC

It's my money. I'll do what I want with it. But how to do this without making Uncle Sam mad and not taking a penalty for early withdraw? Found this avenue on accident when looking for a Forex broker.
Found a local trust company, explained to them I wanted to trade Forex (and possibly invest in more rental properties when that market takes a crap) and wanted to know how I could use my old 401k (403b) to accomplish this.
Here are the steps in crude form:
You CANNOT distribute any of this money to yourself (legally). Any brokerage accounts or real estate would have to be purchased under the LLC. Waiting on the distribution from the Trust to the LLC bank account as I type this.
You can also keep contributing to that IRA and passing it through to the LLC and claim tax deductions if you're eligible.
For now I plan on doing standard long term stock investing, possibly throw some at BTC, and invest in another rental property.
submitted by pepper167 to personalfinance [link] [comments]

CRYPTOCURRENCY BITCOIN

CRYPTOCURRENCY BITCOIN
Bitcoin Table of contents expand: 1. What is Bitcoin? 2. Understanding Bitcoin 3. How Bitcoin Works 4. What's a Bitcoin Worth? 5. How Bitcoin Began 6. Who Invented Bitcoin? 7. Before Satoshi 8. Why Is Satoshi Anonymous? 9. The Suspects 10. Can Satoshi's Identity Be Proven? 11. Receiving Bitcoins As Payment 12. Working For Bitcoins 13. Bitcoin From Interest Payments 14. Bitcoins From Gambling 15. Investing in Bitcoins 16. Risks of Bitcoin Investing 17. Bitcoin Regulatory Risk 18. Security Risk of Bitcoins 19. Insurance Risk 20. Risk of Bitcoin Fraud 21. Market Risk 22. Bitcoin's Tax Risk What is Bitcoin?
Bitcoin is a digital currency created in January 2009. It follows the ideas set out in a white paper by the mysterious Satoshi Nakamoto, whose true identity is yet to be verified. Bitcoin offers the promise of lower transaction fees than traditional online payment mechanisms and is operated by a decentralized authority, unlike government-issued currencies.
There are no physical bitcoins, only balances kept on a public ledger in the cloud, that – along with all Bitcoin transactions – is verified by a massive amount of computing power. Bitcoins are not issued or backed by any banks or governments, nor are individual bitcoins valuable as a commodity. Despite it not being legal tender, Bitcoin charts high on popularity, and has triggered the launch of other virtual currencies collectively referred to as Altcoins.
Understanding Bitcoin Bitcoin is a type of cryptocurrency: Balances are kept using public and private "keys," which are long strings of numbers and letters linked through the mathematical encryption algorithm that was used to create them. The public key (comparable to a bank account number) serves as the address which is published to the world and to which others may send bitcoins. The private key (comparable to an ATM PIN) is meant to be a guarded secret and only used to authorize Bitcoin transmissions. Style notes: According to the official Bitcoin Foundation, the word "Bitcoin" is capitalized in the context of referring to the entity or concept, whereas "bitcoin" is written in the lower case when referring to a quantity of the currency (e.g. "I traded 20 bitcoin") or the units themselves. The plural form can be either "bitcoin" or "bitcoins."
How Bitcoin Works Bitcoin is one of the first digital currencies to use peer-to-peer technology to facilitate instant payments. The independent individuals and companies who own the governing computing power and participate in the Bitcoin network, also known as "miners," are motivated by rewards (the release of new bitcoin) and transaction fees paid in bitcoin. These miners can be thought of as the decentralized authority enforcing the credibility of the Bitcoin network. New bitcoin is being released to the miners at a fixed, but periodically declining rate, such that the total supply of bitcoins approaches 21 million. One bitcoin is divisible to eight decimal places (100 millionths of one bitcoin), and this smallest unit is referred to as a Satoshi. If necessary, and if the participating miners accept the change, Bitcoin could eventually be made divisible to even more decimal places. Bitcoin mining is the process through which bitcoins are released to come into circulation. Basically, it involves solving a computationally difficult puzzle to discover a new block, which is added to the blockchain and receiving a reward in the form of a few bitcoins. The block reward was 50 new bitcoins in 2009; it decreases every four years. As more and more bitcoins are created, the difficulty of the mining process – that is, the amount of computing power involved – increases. The mining difficulty began at 1.0 with Bitcoin's debut back in 2009; at the end of the year, it was only 1.18. As of February 2019, the mining difficulty is over 6.06 billion. Once, an ordinary desktop computer sufficed for the mining process; now, to combat the difficulty level, miners must use faster hardware like Application-Specific Integrated Circuits (ASIC), more advanced processing units like Graphic Processing Units (GPUs), etc.
What's a Bitcoin Worth? In 2017 alone, the price of Bitcoin rose from a little under $1,000 at the beginning of the year to close to $19,000, ending the year more than 1,400% higher. Bitcoin's price is also quite dependent on the size of its mining network since the larger the network is, the more difficult – and thus more costly – it is to produce new bitcoins. As a result, the price of bitcoin has to increase as its cost of production also rises. The Bitcoin mining network's aggregate power has more than tripled over the past twelve months.
How Bitcoin Began
Aug. 18, 2008: The domain name bitcoin.org is registered. Today, at least, this domain is "WhoisGuard Protected," meaning the identity of the person who registered it is not public information.
Oct. 31, 2008: Someone using the name Satoshi Nakamoto makes an announcement on The Cryptography Mailing list at metzdowd.com: "I've been working on a new electronic cash system that's fully peer-to-peer, with no trusted third party. The paper is available at http://www.bitcoin.org/bitcoin.pdf." This link leads to the now-famous white paper published on bitcoin.org entitled "Bitcoin: A Peer-to-Peer Electronic Cash System." This paper would become the Magna Carta for how Bitcoin operates today.
Jan. 3, 2009: The first Bitcoin block is mined, Block 0. This is also known as the "genesis block" and contains the text: "The Times 03/Jan/2009 Chancellor on brink of second bailout for banks," perhaps as proof that the block was mined on or after that date, and perhaps also as relevant political commentary.
Jan. 8, 2009: The first version of the Bitcoin software is announced on The Cryptography Mailing list.
Jan. 9, 2009: Block 1 is mined, and Bitcoin mining commences in earnest.
Who Invented Bitcoin?
No one knows. Not conclusively, at any rate. Satoshi Nakamoto is the name associated with the person or group of people who released the original Bitcoin white paper in 2008 and worked on the original Bitcoin software that was released in 2009. The Bitcoin protocol requires users to enter a birthday upon signup, and we know that an individual named Satoshi Nakamoto registered and put down April 5 as a birth date. And that's about it.
Before Satoshi
Though it is tempting to believe the media's spin that Satoshi Nakamoto is a solitary, quixotic genius who created Bitcoin out of thin air, such innovations do not happen in a vacuum. All major scientific discoveries, no matter how original-seeming, were built on previously existing research. There are precursors to Bitcoin: Adam Back’s Hashcash, invented in 1997, and subsequently Wei Dai’s b-money, Nick Szabo’s bit gold and Hal Finney’s Reusable Proof of Work. The Bitcoin white paper itself cites Hashcash and b-money, as well as various other works spanning several research fields.
Why Is Satoshi Anonymous?
There are two primary motivations for keeping Bitcoin's inventor keeping his or her or their identity secret. One is privacy. As Bitcoin has gained in popularity – becoming something of a worldwide phenomenon – Satoshi Nakamoto would likely garner a lot of attention from the media and from governments.
The other reason is safety. Looking at 2009 alone, 32,489 blocks were mined; at the then-reward rate of 50 BTC per block, the total payout in 2009 was 1,624,500 BTC, which at today’s prices is over $900 million. One may conclude that only Satoshi and perhaps a few other people were mining through 2009 and that they possess a majority of that $900 million worth of BTC. Someone in possession of that much BTC could become a target of criminals, especially since bitcoins are less like stocks and more like cash, where the private keys needed to authorize spending could be printed out and literally kept under a mattress. While it's likely the inventor of Bitcoin would take precautions to make any extortion-induced transfers traceable, remaining anonymous is a good way for Satoshi to limit exposure.
The Suspects
Numerous people have been suggested as possible Satoshi Nakamoto by major media outlets. Oct. 10, 2011, The New Yorker published an article speculating that Nakamoto might be Irish cryptography student Michael Clear or economic sociologist Vili Lehdonvirta. A day later, Fast Company suggested that Nakamoto could be a group of three people – Neal King, Vladimir Oksman and Charles Bry – who together appear on a patent related to secure communications that were filed two months before bitcoin.org was registered. A Vice article published in May 2013 added more suspects to the list, including Gavin Andresen, the Bitcoin project’s lead developer; Jed McCaleb, co-founder of now-defunct Bitcoin exchange Mt. Gox; and famed Japanese mathematician Shinichi Mochizuki.
In December 2013, Techcrunch published an interview with researcher Skye Grey who claimed textual analysis of published writings shows a link between Satoshi and bit-gold creator Nick Szabo. And perhaps most famously, in March 2014, Newsweek ran a cover article claiming that Satoshi is actually an individual named Satoshi Nakamoto – a 64-year-old Japanese-American engineer living in California. The list of suspects is long, and all the individuals deny being Satoshi.
Can Satoshi's Identity Be Proven?
It would seem even early collaborators on the project don’t have verifiable proof of Satoshi’s identity. To reveal conclusively who Satoshi Nakamoto is, a definitive link would need to be made between his/her activity with Bitcoin and his/her identity. That could come in the form of linking the party behind the domain registration of bitcoin.org, email and forum accounts used by Satoshi Nakamoto, or ownership of some portion of the earliest mined bitcoins. Even though the bitcoins Satoshi likely possesses are traceable on the blockchain, it seems he/she has yet to cash them out in a way that reveals his/her identity. If Satoshi were to move his/her bitcoins to an exchange today, this might attract attention, but it seems unlikely that a well-funded and successful exchange would betray a customer's privacy.
Receiving Bitcoins As Payment
Bitcoins can be accepted as a means of payment for products sold or services provided. If you have a brick and mortar store, just display a sign saying “Bitcoin Accepted Here” and many of your customers may well take you up on it; the transactions can be handled with the requisite hardware terminal or wallet address through QR codes and touch screen apps. An online business can easily accept bitcoins by just adding this payment option to the others it offers, like credit cards, PayPal, etc. Online payments will require a Bitcoin merchant tool (an external processor like Coinbase or BitPay).
Working For Bitcoins
Those who are self-employed can get paid for a job in bitcoins. There are several websites/job boards which are dedicated to the digital currency:
Work For Bitcoin brings together work seekers and prospective employers through its websiteCoinality features jobs – freelance, part-time and full-time – that offer payment in bitcoins, as well as Dogecoin and LitecoinJobs4Bitcoins, part of reddit.comBitGigs
Bitcoin From Interest Payments
Another interesting way (literally) to earn bitcoins is by lending them out and being repaid in the currency. Lending can take three forms – direct lending to someone you know; through a website which facilitates peer-to-peer transactions, pairing borrowers and lenders; or depositing bitcoins in a virtual bank that offers a certain interest rate for Bitcoin accounts. Some such sites are Bitbond, BitLendingClub, and BTCjam. Obviously, you should do due diligence on any third-party site.
Bitcoins From Gambling
It’s possible to play at casinos that cater to Bitcoin aficionados, with options like online lotteries, jackpots, spread betting, and other games. Of course, the pros and cons and risks that apply to any sort of gambling and betting endeavors are in force here too.
Investing in Bitcoins
There are many Bitcoin supporters who believe that digital currency is the future. Those who endorse it are of the view that it facilitates a much faster, no-fee payment system for transactions across the globe. Although it is not itself any backed by any government or central bank, bitcoin can be exchanged for traditional currencies; in fact, its exchange rate against the dollar attracts potential investors and traders interested in currency plays. Indeed, one of the primary reasons for the growth of digital currencies like Bitcoin is that they can act as an alternative to national fiat money and traditional commodities like gold.
In March 2014, the IRS stated that all virtual currencies, including bitcoins, would be taxed as property rather than currency. Gains or losses from bitcoins held as capital will be realized as capital gains or losses, while bitcoins held as inventory will incur ordinary gains or losses.
Like any other asset, the principle of buying low and selling high applies to bitcoins. The most popular way of amassing the currency is through buying on a Bitcoin exchange, but there are many other ways to earn and own bitcoins. Here are a few options which Bitcoin enthusiasts can explore.
Risks of Bitcoin Investing
Though Bitcoin was not designed as a normal equity investment (no shares have been issued), some speculative investors were drawn to the digital money after it appreciated rapidly in May 2011 and again in November 2013. Thus, many people purchase bitcoin for its investment value rather than as a medium of exchange.
However, their lack of guaranteed value and digital nature means the purchase and use of bitcoins carries several inherent risks. Many investor alerts have been issued by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA), the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), and other agencies.
The concept of a virtual currency is still novel and, compared to traditional investments, Bitcoin doesn't have much of a long-term track record or history of credibility to back it. With their increasing use, bitcoins are becoming less experimental every day, of course; still, after eight years, they (like all digital currencies) remain in a development phase, still evolving. "It is pretty much the highest-risk, highest-return investment that you can possibly make,” says Barry Silbert, CEO of Digital Currency Group, which builds and invests in Bitcoin and blockchain companies.
Bitcoin Regulatory Risk
Investing money into Bitcoin in any of its many guises is not for the risk-averse. Bitcoins are a rival to government currency and may be used for black market transactions, money laundering, illegal activities or tax evasion. As a result, governments may seek to regulate, restrict or ban the use and sale of bitcoins, and some already have. Others are coming up with various rules. For example, in 2015, the New York State Department of Financial Services finalized regulations that would require companies dealing with the buy, sell, transfer or storage of bitcoins to record the identity of customers, have a compliance officer and maintain capital reserves. The transactions worth $10,000 or more will have to be recorded and reported.
Although more agencies will follow suit, issuing rules and guidelines, the lack of uniform regulations about bitcoins (and other virtual currency) raises questions over their longevity, liquidity, and universality.
Security Risk of Bitcoins
Bitcoin exchanges are entirely digital and, as with any virtual system, are at risk from hackers, malware and operational glitches. If a thief gains access to a Bitcoin owner's computer hard drive and steals his private encryption key, he could transfer the stolen Bitcoins to another account. (Users can prevent this only if bitcoins are stored on a computer which is not connected to the internet, or else by choosing to use a paper wallet – printing out the Bitcoin private keys and addresses, and not keeping them on a computer at all.) Hackers can also target Bitcoin exchanges, gaining access to thousands of accounts and digital wallets where bitcoins are stored. One especially notorious hacking incident took place in 2014, when Mt. Gox, a Bitcoin exchange in Japan, was forced to close down after millions of dollars worth of bitcoins were stolen.
This is particularly problematic once you remember that all Bitcoin transactions are permanent and irreversible. It's like dealing with cash: Any transaction carried out with bitcoins can only be reversed if the person who has received them refunds them. There is no third party or a payment processor, as in the case of a debit or credit card – hence, no source of protection or appeal if there is a problem.
Insurance Risk
Some investments are insured through the Securities Investor Protection Corporation. Normal bank accounts are insured through the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) up to a certain amount depending on the jurisdiction. Bitcoin exchanges and Bitcoin accounts are not insured by any type of federal or government program.
Risk of Bitcoin Fraud
While Bitcoin uses private key encryption to verify owners and register transactions, fraudsters and scammers may attempt to sell false bitcoins. For instance, in July 2013, the SEC brought legal action against an operator of a Bitcoin-related Ponzi scheme.
Market Risk
Like with any investment, Bitcoin values can fluctuate. Indeed, the value of the currency has seen wild swings in price over its short existence. Subject to high volume buying and selling on exchanges, it has a high sensitivity to “news." According to the CFPB, the price of bitcoins fell by 61% in a single day in 2013, while the one-day price drop in 2014 has been as big as 80%.
If fewer people begin to accept Bitcoin as a currency, these digital units may lose value and could become worthless. There is already plenty of competition, and though Bitcoin has a huge lead over the other 100-odd digital currencies that have sprung up, thanks to its brand recognition and venture capital money, a technological break-through in the form of a better virtual coin is always a threat.
Bitcoin's Tax Risk
As bitcoin is ineligible to be included in any tax-advantaged retirement accounts, there are no good, legal options to shield investments from taxation.
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Related Terms
Satoshi
The satoshi is the smallest unit of the bitcoin cryptocurrency. It is named after Satoshi Nakamoto, the creator of the protocol used in block chains and the bitcoin cryptocurrency.
Chartalism Chartalism is a non-mainstream theory of money that emphasizes the impact of government policies and activities on the value of money.
Satoshi Nakamoto The name used by the unknown creator of the protocol used in the bitcoin cryptocurrency. Satoshi Nakamoto is closely-associated with blockchain technology.
Bitcoin Mining, Explained Breaking down everything you need to know about Bitcoin Mining, from Blockchain and Block Rewards to Proof-of-Work and Mining Pools.
Understanding Bitcoin Unlimited Bitcoin Unlimited is a proposed upgrade to Bitcoin Core that allows larger block sizes. The upgrade is designed to improve transaction speed through scale.
Blockchain Explained
A guide to help you understand what blockchain is and how it can be used by industries. You've probably encountered a definition like this: “blockchain is a distributed, decentralized, public ledger." But blockchain is easier to understand than it sounds.
Top 6 Books to Learn About Bitcoin About UsAdvertiseContactPrivacy PolicyTerms of UseCareers Investopedia is part of the Dotdash publishing family.The Balance Lifewire TripSavvy The Spruceand more
By Satoshi Nakamoto
Read it once, go read other crypto stuff, read it again… keep doing this until the whole document makes sense. It’ll take a while, but you’ll get there. This is the original whitepaper introducing and explaining Bitcoin, and there’s really nothing better out there to understand on the subject.
“What is needed is an electronic payment system based on cryptographic proof instead of trust, allowing any two willing parties to transact directly with each other without the need for a trusted third party

submitted by adrian_morrison to BlockchainNews [link] [comments]

Weekly Forex & Crypto Analysis by PrimeXBT

Weekly Forex & Crypto Analysis by PrimeXBT
The week has started and was led by the only title and header around all economic news which is “US-China trade wars”.
US-China trade wars in general had its effect on all markets, including cryptocurrency. The United States wants to tighten cryptocurrency use and claimed that it’s been used by smugglers and drug-dealers and pointed out that most of the transactions are made in China.
This week BTC tried to break $10500 on Monday, August 26th and was rejected, the price then was floating between $10400-10300 and continued the correction down to $10027. Uncertainty in the BTC has ended when the price hit $10400 again and showed a massive drop to $9366. We will point out several reasons of this week’s drop. The drop could be a result of an update in the US when rumors on crypto-currency taxation became real. Several notes sent by the IRS to crypto-currency holders pushed some investors to get rid of the BTC and led to a major sell.
The Wright and Kleiman case brings another reason to worry about. If Kleiman family surely inherited billions of $ worth of Bitcoin, then they should declare IRS the quantity and pay state taxes. Most probably, when these BTC’s received if they exist, the Kleiman family will sell them, which will result another drop-down of BTC.
CME Exchange’s futures contracts for Bitcoin is expiring today, though the Exchange showed a record-high $515M daily trading volume in May, futures expiry date gave extra-strength to sellers.
The price by the time published is traded at $9608 per BTC, from the technical point of view the price still has to find greater grounds for another massive jump.
https://preview.redd.it/8f0tliwapnj31.png?width=1468&format=png&auto=webp&s=64a5214d8a583bd7b7f3dcdd5f3de63290697050
Though we can see that a double-bottom pattern in 1-hour chart and most likely BTC will test $9750
https://preview.redd.it/vib20xqcpnj31.png?width=1468&format=png&auto=webp&s=06b1a9de59c8c76ecc447b5e2b0a8d506a79c12b
CME Exchange will continue to offer Bitcoin futures which is a positive sign for the cryptocurrency and announcement of the release of ICE-backed Bakkt Bitcoin futures in September 23 could be that pump to get the price above $10K.

Now let’s move to Forex market

The pair to watch this week and the next week is EURUSD.
Economy of Germany which EU's locomotive and other countries are cars, has showed a slight 0.1% decrease in the second quarter of 2019 related to the previous quarter. We can never deny the fact that the EU union with all its economy and power of its currency is completely dependent to the economic well-being of Germany. If the third quarter of this year doesn't show mercy to Germany's economy or Germany doesn't change policies to not only stabilize but improve the economy, the EU should prepare well for recession.
Not only economic state of Germany but rumors and news and overall hype over Brexit and Italy's economic crisis are considered to be a sinker of Euro against USD. For Euro to gain power and for EURUSD to show an uptrend again, firstly all rumors and preparations on recession should be reduced to nothing and EU states should do the needful to prevent the new economic crisis.
This week’s economic data from Germany was not positive, IFO Business Climate was below forecasted 95.1 and 94.3 was announced, German GDP was -0.1. These were news which weakened the European currency, although the worst scenario was yet to come. Thursday, August 29 Germany made an announced on the unemployment, and the number was four times higher than on the previous unemployment change, 4K. Since the announcement EURUSD was showing downwards movement and plummeted to 1.0990
If no signs of progress are shown next week, especially if the German Manufacturing PMI numbers don’t show positive, the price will continue downtrend to 1.0950 and find the next support at 1.0850
https://preview.redd.it/cso52ruepnj31.png?width=1468&format=png&auto=webp&s=21e4bdfed18b0bcce872b8714efa4d5d8fdc8b71
The political tension between EU and UK, US and China last week showed us more-or-less unpredictable movements in US, China, HK, EU, UK stock market indices. Since the “trade-war” begun and US applying higher tariffs on Chinese goods and China taking counter-action the only gainers of these back-to-back pokes were Gold and Silver. Gold showed one more time that it’s the most trusted asset to invest. The price hit $1555 highs this week and is now showing signs of short-term correction being traded at $1526. Major Investment institutions such as UBS and Citigroup look positive on Golds new summit ascents. Mainly UBS has stated that the next week the price could reach $1600.
From the technical point we can see that the price is trying to break the barrier at 1530, and is still unlucky.
https://preview.redd.it/huvtsyugpnj31.png?width=1468&format=png&auto=webp&s=9ccae0383301cabe7b0b479bde81b72cee5aa81c
This could mean that if the support at $1520 is broken, the correction will continue to $1515 and $1507.
If the downtrend is impulsive the price will reach $1494, where it will find support and another upwards move shall be expected.
https://preview.redd.it/oyzz33oipnj31.png?width=1468&format=png&auto=webp&s=1ae2f71cb0fece2770bcff716bd59d39e7a9245d
At the other hand, confirmation of Gold’s uptrend move will be breaking of resistance at $1530 where the price shall face a mile-stone of resistances at 1545-1563-1571.
From the Global prospective we should follow the upcoming Manufacturing PMI’s announcements of Germany and the US, US Non-Farm payrolls and Unemployment rates. Pay a very close attention to announcements of these three states Australia, UK and Canada, as well. Report prepared by analysts from PrimeXBT.
submitted by Esabellaason to PrimeXBT [link] [comments]

Extremely confused with taxes

I dont understand how this isnt talked about more... unless im mistaken, i read that if you made any trades in forex in the tax year, every trade has to be reported to the IRS. Where it makes no sense is how to do it without consulting with an accountant. i only lost ~$600 so i didnt even make anything, its ridiculous that i have to do all of this digging just to figure out how to report my fuck ups that i already feel bad about. It says on the turbo tax website to enter it as other misc income but all it gives me is Description and Amount... Are you telling me i have to do a description and amount for every single trade i made in 2018? that would be about 500 trades
submitted by imGoingToEatYourTots to Forex [link] [comments]

A personal friend is managing an investment account for me for a commission. This is all a big tax mystery to me.

A friend is managing a Forex venture for me in exchange for a 10% commission on the profits (oil and water, I know). It’s going well, though.
I am new to U.S. tax policy with regards to capital gains. I have some limited understandings that I’d like to either confirm or correct, as well as questions regarding tax procedures.
I’m lead to believe that taxes will be collected on the gains each year, regardless of whether these profits have ever seen my bank account. Even if I do not touch these funds for years, I will owe a large percentage of them each year, significantly crippling my buying power and setting me back repeatedly. Is this correct, or is there some (legal) strategy for deferring tax payment on these gains, like on a 401(k), for instance? Is there some clause about not “cashing out” the funds for a certain number of years, or considering this to be a retirement fund? Does the IRS not take into consideration whether the funds are “tied up” to any degree?
Are tax rates on Forex gains bracketed? I’m familiar with the Section 1256 60/40 tax rate, but it’s unclear to me whether there is a point at which the rate spikes for larger gains. Follow up question: Is the 40% that is taxed based on your income bracket based on your, like, day job income bracket (your primary source of income), or your total income with the Forex gains? This could come out to a big difference.
I’m even more ignorant when it comes to my friend’s cut of the profits. -Who bears the tax burden on that money? -Can I claim that money as some form of non-taxable income/expense/loss, possibly shifting the tax burden to them upon receipt? It is their money, after all, but perhaps it is not “legally” their money. Should we take some sort of steps to make it legally their money? -Is there some legal way they can claim the money as non-taxable upon receipt? Do we both pay taxes on it - me upon making it and them upon receiving it? That idea just seems odd. -Does their operation have to be legally set up as a “business” in order for the tax burden to be alleviated for one or both of us? Would that help, or maybe hurt us?
I want to add that I do intend on spending some time with a tax man (with both of us present) to try to understand these concepts fully. However, I have no idea when that will happen and I was hoping there would be some quick answers to the more cut and dry questions.
Thank you for any answers you can offer a noob.
submitted by 17463680002 to tax [link] [comments]

Introduction to investing as a U.S. citizen residing in Japan

[meta: I ask for help in making sure this information is accurate and correct. Please contribute as you see fit!]
WARNING!! I am not a lawyer, accountant, or broker, nor do I have any experience or training in any of those fields. ALWAYS confirm with a professional before taking any advice you read on the internet.
Foreward
If you're old enough to pay taxes, you should start investing. The earlier, the better.
Here’s another example to illustrate the enormous benefit of getting an early start. At age 25, Eric Early invests $4,000 per year in a Roth IRA for 10 years and stops investing. His total investment is $40,000. Larry Lately makes yearly deposits of $4,000 in his Roth IRA starting at age 35 for 30 years. His total investment is $120,000. Assuming both portfolios earn an 8 percent average annual return, at age 65, Eric’s IRA will be worth $629,741, but Larry’s IRA will be worth only $489,383. By starting 10 years earlier and making one third of the investment, Eric ends up with 29 percent more.
- quote from "The Boglehead's Guide to Investing"
Target audience
This is an introduction for U.S. citizens with residency in Japan who want to do long-term investing in U.S. equity (stocks, bonds, etc.).
Disclaimer
This advice may not be accurate for citizens of countries other than the U.S. or for those U.S. citizens living in Japan who work for the military or are only temporarily living and working in Japan as affiliated with a U.S. company. This is also not advice for ForEx or day traders looking to make money. Nor is it advice for what to invest in. This is also not advice for investing in the Japanese stock market.
This is just one way to invest in U.S. equity from Japan. There are other ways.
Assumptions
  • You're a U.S. citizen
  • Your income is in JPY
  • You want to invest in U.S. equity (stock market, bond market, etc)
  • You have basic knowledge about taxes and tax-related terms
  • You have at least $10,000 USD to invest (or $3,000 USD if age 25 or younger)
Background
I am an ordinary guy living in Japan. I have disposable income and, rather than pour all of it into my local izakaya and Philipino hookers (who hang out in front of Mister Donut at night and ask if I "want the massage?" (just kidding, really!)), I wanted to invest in my future by saving for retirement. I'm an early 30's-year-old guy and spent about a month reading up on investing and then set off trying to invest as a resident of Japan.
My Story
I moved to Japan 3 years ago after working in the U.S. I have an IRA leftover from my time in the U.S., but never contributed to it since moving to Japan (thankfully - find out why in a bit). I recently saw a post from /personalfinance (seriously, go read information in that sub if you want to have more money upon retirement or just get out of debt!) and decided to read the book "The Boglehead's Guide to Investing" based on recommendations there. After that, I started looking into my options for investing from Japan.
Before I left the U.S. for Japan, I rolled over my 401k into an IRA using Vanguard (arguably the best broker available for U.S. citizens). Since moving to Japan, I had not contributed anything to my IRA. So, the first thing I wanted to do was start contributing to my IRA again, and use any remainder to invest in U.S. equity. Turns out this is not as easy as it sounds.
I found out that in order to legally contribute to my IRA, I had to pay U.S. taxes on my income used to contribute to it. Well, if you're like me and don't make an awful lot of money, you're probably filing with Foreign Tax Credit/IRS Foreign Earned Income Exclusion. This stuff basically let's you deduct all your taxes in Japan, as it on Japanese income and you already paid glorious Nippon taxes on that income. For me, this basically meant that I owed the IRS absolutely nothing every year. Great! Right? Buuuuut since I didn't pay any U.S. tax on my income, I cannot use it to contribute to my IRA! Dammit! (But actually a blessing in disguise because if I had been contributing to my IRA, I would have been breaking U.S. tax law because I didn't pay taxes on it.)
So, I started looking into other ways to invest: the U.S. stock market, bonds, etc. After reading The Boglehead's Guide, I knew I wanted to invest in Vanguard's mutual index funds. My first instinct was to open a brokerage account (which is different from your IRA account) with Vanguard. I started filling out the online form, but ran into issues. You have to specify a U.S. address. Also, you have to specify your U.S. employer. I had neither of these, so I called Vanguard (from Japan at a ridiculous call charge) and spoke with someone about doing this. They gave me the OK but said I'd have to submit a paper form through snail mail, and sent me a PDF to fill out and mail in. I mailed it (from Japan using EMS which was like $20..), and got a call about a week later. Surprise! Because I'm not working in Japan temporarily for a U.S. company or living on a U.S. military base (considered U.S. soil, I assume?), I actually can't open a brokerage account with them. Dammit again! What a waste of money calling them and mailing the form overseas.
So, I started looking into other options. I read about a few other brokers and most people agreed that I should either use Fidelity or Interactive Brokers. I had never heard of Interactive Brokers and honestly they seemed scary at first, so I decided to go with Fidelity, who I had actually heard of and is a U.S. based firm. I created an account with Fidelity, but once again ran into roadblocks when trying to open a stock trading account. I didn't have a U.S. address or employer, and actually wasn't able to link my U.S. bank account with them either (for reasons unknown). Dammit once again!
So, I started reading more about Interactive Brokers. Okay, it's still a little scary, but there are positive reports about using them online. I signed up for an account with minimal hassle, linked up my bank account, was able to transfer money over to them, and then successfully bought U.S. shares! Sweet success! Finally!

How to Invest

Part I: Contributing to your IRA
If you do not have an IRA, you probably should, as they are your basic investment option and tax-friendly to boot. However, good luck setting one up as a resident in Japan! Vanguard will happily babysit an IRA you opened prior to leaving the U.S., but they will not let you open a new one with a foreign address. I don't know about other brokers such as Fidelity or Schwabb, but it's probably the same story there.
If you are like me and happen to have an IRA leftover in the U.S., you CAN contribute to it, but in order to do so you must not deduct your Japanese tax on your IRS 1040 or file Form 1116, "Foreign Tax Credit". In other words, you must pay U.S. taxes on any income used to contribute to the IRA.
Refer to your broker for how to actually get the money to them from Japan.
Part II: Investing in U.S. Equity from Japan
Using Interactive Brokers
First, let me tell you a little bit about Interactive Brokers (IB). They are a service mostly used by regulaprofessional traders. The fees are very low and reasonable. However, they have a service charge of $10/month if your commission is equal to or less than $10 USD in that month. This is probably not a problem for people over 25 years old investing with $10,000+ USD, but for people 25 and under with an initial investment of $3000, it's possible you might not make the minimum commission per month. Beware of this fee.
IB lets you fund the account from many different currencies, regardless of what market you are buying (this needs confirmation, but seems to be accurate). So, whether you have a U.S. bank account or a Japanese bank account, you can fund the IB account. You can even fund from both.
IB does not let you invest in U.S. mutual funds. This sounds like a deal-breaker, but it's actually not. You can still invest in U.S. ETFs. This includes Vanguard's total stock market index ETF, total bond market index ETF, etc.
IB has an iPhone app that is pretty good and probably an Android app too. Although, as someone doing long-term investing for retirement, you probably don't need this and don't want to be checking your account too much (refer to /personalfinance as to why).
IB has multiple account types. You will probably see IBLLC and IBSJ. The differences are two-fold: First: an IBSJ is only used to trade Japan domestic equity. You don't want this because you want to trade U.S. equity. Instead, IBLLC is used to trade overseas (U.S. equity). Second: as of 2016, IBJS requires your My Number information, but IBLLC does not. Again, you don't want IBJS, so don't worry about the My Number information.
Open a "Japan Resident Individual Account for IBLLC" account online. This is a lengthy process. Make sure you have the required information.
  • You will need to send info about your current address in Japan, your 在留カード (zairyuu/"gaijin" card), job information, bank account information, and so on. I got confused and sent my My Number card information as well, but this only caused a hiccup in their process and I was told to remove it. Don't submit your My Number information.
  • You need to choose your base currency. Your base currency determines what currency you trade in and receive dividends/money from selling in. I think you need to specify USD here, but not sure. I chose USD because U.S. stocks are in USD and I used my U.S. bank account to intially fund my account. It may not matter, but this needs confirmation.
  • You need to specify that you have trading experience. I forget the actual numbers you need to put into the form, but make sure you put enough experience that allows you to trade ETFs overseas. You can fiddle with the numbers right there in the form, and options open up as you change the numbers. Play with it until it's just right. This part is hazy, and just seems to be some safeguards for IB so that new investors can't sue/blame IB for their own trading stupidity when they lose all their money. If you really don't have any experience trading, IB offers virtual "fake" accounts you can use to play around with trading. I suggest you try it.
After about a week you should have your new account. The next step is funding it, or you may have selected to fund it up front when you created the account so it may already be done. Anyway, the easiest way is to have IB request the wire transfer from your bank. I did this. It was really annoying, but it took about another week or so to go through. Beware that you probably can't start buying right away and need to wait for the transfer to clear.
Congratulations! You're ready to start buying now. Refer to /personalfinance in what to invest in. Remember that you are limited to buying ETFs and a few other things, and not mutual funds (but you can get their ETF equivalents).
Using
TBD... (anyone want to fill this out?)
Part III: Taxes
You need to declare and pay taxes on your dividends and any capital gains you make. Beware.
TBD... (this is arguably the most important part, but I just don't have time to go into it now. Someone feel free to help!)
TL;DR: Open an account with Interactive Brokers online and buy ETFs.
submitted by crab_balls to japanlife [link] [comments]

The Italian Referendum ELI5

SO
This weekend, Sunday Dec 4 is the "Italian Referendum", a much hyped vote being put to the Italian populace concerning a large amount of varied and confusing proposed changes to the laws and constitution of Italy. In the "news", this referendum has been pounded with as much drama as is needed to get clicks. Here at /Forex, we recognize that these drama generating tactics will obscure what is likely the reality, so we wanted to give you a heads up on what to expect.
The short version is that the current Prime Minister Matteo Renzi and his center-left Democratic Party are pushing a bill to amend the Italian Constitution to allow for more centralization of Government. The Italian Gov't is very decentralized, and has been so since WWII, a response to the conglomeration of power that Il Duce Mussolini sought for a strong, centralized, Fascist government. Beyond this, it gets confusing, muddy. Basically, there is a push to make the power shift from the provinces to the center in Rome. Mr Renzi has stated that these reforms are necessary for the well being of Italy, and that he will resign if they are not passed. If you want your eyes to glaze over read the wiki page.
Where "Italexit" comes in is here: Theoretically (modified thanks to information from Cmossensor and enivid)
However, leaving the EU is not as easy for the Italians as the media has made it out to be.
There is a great analysis here at Business Insider as to why; I'll quote the key parts:
Morgan Stanley staff members Daniele Antonucci and Phanikiran Naraparaju point to Article 75 of Italy's written constitution, which enshrines the fact that Italy cannot hold a referendum on anything related to international treaties: "A general referendum may be held to repeal, in whole or in part, a law or a measure having the force of law, when so requested by five hundred thousand voters or five Regional Councils. No referendum may be held on a law regulating taxes, the budget, amnesty or pardon, or a law ratifying an international treaty." Membership of both the European Union and the euro, are by definition international in nature, and as a result, for Italy to give its people a say on leaving either, the constitution would have to be changed. Obviously, that is no easy task and would require a strongly eurosceptic government with a serious will to leave the EU.
The bold is the key part. BI's analysis:
This is the chain of events Naraparaju and Antonucci think needs to happen for Italy to drop out of the EU (emphasis ours): "So, the bar for leaving is high and the chain of events much longer than, say, for the UK to leave the EU. In Italy, a Eurosceptic party would have to win an election with an absolute majority and then set in motion the exit process after having changed the constitution with a two-thirds majority in both chambers or 'just' an absolute majority followed by a referendum. As Eurozone membership is indissolubly linked to EU membership, leaving the EU would also automatically mean leaving the EMU."
The TL;DR: It's simple:
More feed back is appreciated from those of you who study this. But those of you wondering "which currency to buy" just don't - margin req's are going up (again...sigh) in the US for this weekend due to amateurs and silly gambling streaks.
submitted by El_Huachinango to Forex [link] [comments]

The "Experts" Are Getting Crypto All Wrong


The forex market has caught a lot of attention in past Bitcoin Trader Review couple of years. Maybe because the promises seen on the sales pages of forex brokers and vendors seem to point to it as a way of easy money. However, because this market has some peculiarities which traders must be thoroughly at home with, many unprepared traders have seen themselves at the wrong end of the market.Investments vary in degrees and conditions. Some people will only invest with reputable institutions in order to reduce risk. With the use of popular online Search Engines, one is able to look around and search for the options that best fit them. On the flip side; with Search Engine Optimization, financial institutions (and other entities that perpetrate as such) can now search for customers who want what those institutions have.Bitcoin is what some online investors have been using since its creation in 2009. With that and the introduction of binary options, some investors consider these crypto and cyber currencies as a litmus test of how the "normal" (or legal) markets are doing; while some have yet to approve the entire scene all together.

It uses a technology called blockchain, and a lot of people have been asking the question "What is blockchain?" So allow me to elaborate a bit. The blockchain network is an open ledger that displays every single transaction that is made, and is incorruptible because there is no 'one' location where all the records are kept. This prevents any cyber attacker from corrupting the information on the ledger. This is the dream that was thought out from its creator, because the rise of bitcoin and blockchain was created out of the distrust from the banks and financial institutions during the housing crisis of 2008. So the idea that every node (computer) on the network could see and verify every transaction that is being made, brings about a form of trust.Imagine if a million people each had a copy of the same instructions to build a toy car, then someone came along and had different instructions, they would not be able to build the same car because they have different instructions. The fact that everyone on the network can see the same transactions builds strong security defences.

This digital monetary system has opened doors for a new way to conduct transactions over the Internet. Especially for dark web users who use the cryptocurrency to buy malicious items like weapons, drugs and hit-men. The continuous use of bitcoin for purchasing goods and services over the internet is what gives it its power in my opinion.Cryptocurrency trading has taken the world by storm and this is what has become the norm for the majority of traders and investors. If you are keen enough to do your research before going into the trading, you stand a chance to enjoy real growth and profits in the end. The worst you can do when it comes to this kind of trading is going into it blindly simply because it is what everyone else is doing. A little research on the major currencies and getting deep into buying and trading fundamentals can make a huge difference. Below are a few guidelines that will jolt you into success with your trading.

The real estate industry is on the cutting edge of many issues. Bitcoins included. While the use of Bitcoins may not be mainstream yet, they are being seen throughout the industry and it's important to understand the risk and rewards that Bitcoins present.Originally introduced in 2009, the Bitcoin (BTC) is considered as a crypto currency. While not widely accepted (yet), the use of Bitcoins is becoming more widespread as many Bitcoin enthusiasts believe that Bitcoin is a government-proof currency (note that the IRS announced last year that it considers bitcoin as "personal property" for tax purposes). Additionally, some banking authorities have a different viewpoint of the crypto currency as they believe that it can be a basis for criminal activity.It's not a formal currency. Rather, Bitcoin is made through 'mining' which is a computer process and unregulated internet-based exchanges allow for the crypto currency to be traded online. Because Bitcoin is not regulated by any federal government or central bank, the majority of merchants will not accept the virtual currency. While the Bitcoin may not be common practice just yet, there are a growing number of real estate listings that are beginning to advertise that they accept the virtual currency.

https://optimusforexreview.com/bitcoin-trader-review/


submitted by harryemily1 to u/harryemily1 [link] [comments]

Figuring out the play on oil

I think this is the sector that that has the biggest opportunities for the first half of 2016. There are some interesting events unfolding and I'm trying to figure out how to get positioned.
I'm thinking a good play would be $EPD as they have the pipeline system for shipping WTI to the coast for shipping. The bad news is it's a MLP which makes taxes a bitch. It does pay a hefty dividend as a passthrough but again it's a bitch during tax time. It's taking a beating this year and is at a good buying level. Another option could be $ETE which should also far more upside but again, it's an MLP. $KMI may be the better option as a former MLP now traded like a normal corp. I've got a friend who is an analyst who says stay away from $KMI but fuck him.
The shale producers are in a tough spot but it leaves an opportunity for some consolidation in the sector with the good ones being acquired. High debt, low availably of credit and low oil prices are bad news for these guys. Shale producers need $40-$50 a barrel to pay the high-yield bonds they used for financing.
$COP may be a good pickup given the news above as well.
Step 1: Collect the information Step2: ??? <--- We are here Step 3: Profit
Open forum time, where do you think the best opportunities are in the sector moving forward?
As is tradition
EDIT: We've also had contango going on in oil the the majority of the year, something has to give. Signs seem to point to lower which make some think it'll go higher...
Oil price is based on supply/demand & market sentiment... a few headlines here and there could set prices on the rebound
submitted by ermahlerd to wallstreetbets [link] [comments]

Crypto Tax Tool Update

Hi Guys,
It has been a couple of weeks since an update. Short version is I wasn't happy with it and wanted to rebuild and then I managed to get sick (and still am)!
Right now 20 people have been given access, but I decided to post a few screenshots here as well to get more feedback. If you are in the waiting list I am adding 5 a day-ish so it won't be too long.
The Main Portfolio view is ultimately what you want for tax time. However, to have complete numbers you need to link your sell trades to the buy trades first. You do this in the Balance pages for each coin.
Right now you can either manually link sell trades to buy trades or you can adopt a FIFO method which over-rides everything. LIFO and other methods will be added come tax time.
I would also like to give a bit more detail how we get AUD values - we hit a (paid) API that provides granular information on pricing. When I say granular I mean spot prices to the second. Let's say we are trying to find the AUD price of XRP - the app will attempt to find an AUD price from BTCmarkets first, if data isn't available then it will find a USD price and if that data isn't available (typical for smaller coins) then it finds the BTC price and then converts BTC to USD/AUD. Any USD values are converted to AUD using the daily XE USD-AUD Forex rate. We basically want to attempt to get the most accurate data possible.
With that said, we have received some suggestions to use free data as well - even though it is hourly pricing - and offer the more accurate data as an added service. I would love to hear more opinions on that.
I will be making this information clearer at a later stage - right now it gets automatically converted and the end-user doesn't see too much except the final AUD price and (if applicable) USD price.
This tax tool will be a paid service
Those who are testing the service and providing feedback will be able to continue to use it for free in perpetuity, but this is being built as a paid tool and will be priced similarly to bitcoin.tax
With that said though there are two things worth noting:
Immediate goals right now are to setup some simple onboarding videos, add IR & Bitfinex imports, be able to export the data in CSV and PDF formats and a feature request/voting platform to guide development and keep it focused on community wants.
submitted by somethingrather to BitcoinAUS [link] [comments]

Quick Forex-Related Question

I live in the USA. I looked into what I might need to do as far as taxes if I get into Forex. It sounds like I probably would need to use form 988 to report gains/losses, but also, something I've read made it kind of sound like I need to make an election with the IRS before I even make a trade. Is that right? It seems like one should be able to wait till next tax season to do that.

Also, is there anything else I may need to do regarding taxes before getting into this?
submitted by iguesimhere2468 to tax [link] [comments]

FOREX AND TAXES  WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW !  FOREX TRADING ... (Forex Taxes) How To File - So Darn Easy Forex™ - YouTube Forex Talk On Forex Trading Income Taxes USA Only with Kouleefx How Forex Traders Can Qualify for Tax Trader Status Forex & Taxes  Do Forex Traders Pay Taxes

Guidance from the IRS is uncertain on spot forex. We’ve done extensive work on forex taxation, and spot forex in particular. We believe that in many cases, spot forex can be treated like forex forwards, qualifying for lower 60/40 tax rates in Section 1256(g) on major currency pairs only. If you have significant trading gains on spot forex contracts, these tax rates may be very desirable. We ... Forex futures and options are 1256 contracts and taxed using the 60/40 rule, with 60% of gains or losses treated as long-term capital gains and 40% as short-term. As you can see, there is nothing difficult about paying for forex profits at this point. However, as this trading becomes more popular, the IRS is bound to come up with more measures that will regulate the trade. But if there’s one piece of advice you should take from this, it’s to always pay your taxes. Tax Forms. Form 6781 from the IRS The IRS taxes 60 percent of the gain as long-term, and 40 percent as short-term. In effect, the IRS blends these rates for any gains, taking into account the maximum tax rates for long- and short-term gains, and the result is a 23 percent rate on gains for all transactions no matter how long you hold them. Spot Trading. Spot currency traders buy and sell currency pairs, which rise and fall ... If you have a net gain in the year's trading, you would be better off paying taxes under Section 1256. Decisions, Decisions. The catch in reporting Forex trading income is that the IRS requires that you elect either Section 1256 or Section 988 taxation on your foreign exchange dealing by Jan. 1 of the tax year. You can't change this election once the year is under way. If you have just begun ... You must express the amounts you report on your U.S. tax return in U.S. dollars. If you receive all or part of your income or pay some or all of your expenses in foreign currency, you must translate the foreign currency into U.S. dollars. How you do this depends on your functional currency. Your functional currency generally is the U.S. dollar unless you are required to use the currency of a ... Note: The exchange rates referenced on this page do not apply when making payments of U.S. taxes to the IRS. If the IRS receives U.S. tax payments in a foreign currency, the exchange rate used by the IRS to convert the foreign currency into U.S. dollars is based on the date the foreign currency is converted to U.S. dollars by the bank processing the payment, not the date the foreign currency ...

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FOREX AND TAXES WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ! FOREX TRADING ...

Tax Treatment of Forex Income - Duration: 12:44. Home Biz Tax Lady 5,114 views. 12:44. IRS Targets Poor People in Audits - Duration: 12:21. Home Biz Tax Lady 554 views. 12:21. How the New Trump ... The So Darn Easy Forex™ Movement help THOUSANDS of Forex traders from all across the world achieve extraordinary results in long term and short term trades. ... Forex Taxes for USA forex traders only. This does pertain to anyone outside of U.S. "I am giving out my own personal experience with business taxes and Forex trading" Follow at your own risk How to pay tax on forex income.. Ask your Tax professional. If you would like to work with me, send me an email or message me on Facebook. If you have and questions or comments please reach out to ... Forex Trade With Us http://bit.ly/2EYIbgI Email: [email protected] Brokers I use https://bit.ly/35kgYkc P.S MY INSTAGRAM IS GONE NOW SO IF SOMEBODY W...

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